Public Art

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Bringing the arts to life and making them accessible to residents and visitors is a key priority for the Town of Silverthorne, and we are proud to host several public art exhibits throughout the year.

From contemporary murals to abstract sculpture and mixed media installations to hand-blown glass pieces, Silverthorne strives to present works that are multicultural, diverse, welcoming, relaxed, natural, creative, progressive, playful, colorful, adventurous and energized. Folks can experience many of these exhibits in and around the Silverthorne Performing Arts Center in the heart of downtown. 

Silverthorne’s public art exhibits are curated by the Town’s Art Selection Committee (ASC) which is composed of seven volunteers with a passion for the arts. The ASC makes recommendations regarding all permanent and temporary public art installations in Silverthorne and strives to select works that best fulfill the goals of the Silverthorne Arts and Culture Strategic Plan. Most exhibits are temporary and rotate regularly, supporting the vibrant and ever-changing energy in Silverthorne’s public spaces.

Current exhibitors: 

Fox mural at the Silverthorne Performing Arts CenterMax Komarov and Matt Mederer: Max Komarov and Matt Mederer are Chicago-based artists who work individually and collaboratively. Together, they form It's Mathematical in a style that mixes realism and optical illusions or geometrical patterns. Ukraine-born Max moved with his family in 2011 to Chicago where he works as a tatoo artist. He started painting as a graffiti artist, but decided to make street art his focus five years ago. He has made murals in Poland, Ukraine, Chicago, Milwaukee, Atlanta and more. Matt, works in databases by day and has a degree in mathematics, lending to the groups name and geometric designs. 

Harold Linke Sculptures

  Harold Linke: Harold Linke has been a commercially successful sculptor for 30 years and has placed well over 1,000 sculptures in public and private collections throughout the world. Based in Colorado and inspired by energy and connection, Harold’s wispy, swirling, white sculptures in steel, composites or bronze exist to connect people with something higher in their own spirit. On outdoor display at the Silverthorne Performing Arts Center through June 2020 are three of Harold’s pieces, created from hand-laid carbon fiber composite, “Encore,”  “Mountain Spell,” and “Spiral Dance.”

 

Interior Weavings ArtEileen Roscina Richardson: Eileen Roscina Richardson is an artist, chef and naturalist from Denver Colorado who works in a wide variety of mediums. Eileen is an experimental filmmaker with a BFA from Emerson College in Boston, MA, a botanical illustrator trained at the School of Botanical Art and Illustration in Denver, CO and a Natural Food Chef trained at the Nutritional Therapy Institute. Through biomimicry and the study of biophilia, her work examines and seeks to raise questions about human's spiritual and social (dis)connection with nature. 

 


Blake Street Glass

Blake Street Glass, Kit Karbler, Dmitri Rudenko, Evan Seeling: Blake Street Glass was started in 1979 when Kit Karbler met Michael David. The two set out to make works that were different from others from the very beginning. Their process of cutting and fastening the pieces helped them to stand out from other glass artists and helped them gain numerous awards and recognition over the years. Dmitri Rudenko has been with Blake Street Glass for 15 years and is a master craftsman with an impeccable attention to detail. Evan Seeling's passion for glassblowing and life are rooted in the philosophy of sacred geometry and the purpose of his work is to show the connection between people and the natural world.



Building Hope Art Display

Building Hope: Three murals created by youths and adults from Building Hope’s Community Connectedness Art Program with Kathye Conti, Facilitator of the Expressive Arts, are on display at the Silverthorne Recreation Center. The murals focus on creating art together in the process of group connection, self-discovery and the importance of community with purpose. Kathy says, “As demonstrated in these murals, Art and Self Expression are very powerful. Always let your love light shine for everyone to see because it is REAL! Always walk true to yourself with an open mind, kind words and loving hearts!”

 

Kia Neill Art Project

Kia Neill: Summit County artist Kia Neill led the community through an interactive photo-sharing art project during the summer of 2018. Residents shared photos of Summit County living through social media via #silverthorneARThunt, and Neill wheat-pasted the images in public locations throughout Silverthor ne. Many pastings can still be viewed around town in popular locations such as the Silverthorne Performing Arts Center outdoor stage and Red Buffalo Café patio. A final digital collage of photography was created with the distorted images that were pasted on different surfaces, such as rocks and concrete, as the paper tore, wrinkled and weathered. The photos can be found layered in the final #silverthorneARThunt print, a work that reflects the atmosphere and character of the Summit County experience. The collage, an infused dye-sublimation aluminum print, can be found on rotating display in Silverthorne’s public buildings.


 

We are proud to have featured the following artists and works as part of the Town of Silverthorne's Public Art Program: 

 Community Works:

  • Before I Die: An oversized, interactive community art board inspired by artist Candy Chang.
  • Snowy Peaks High School Public Art Piece: Muralists Jaime Molina and Pol Corona worked with the students of Snowy Peaks High School to create a dynamic public art piece that was displayed during Youth Art Month at the Silverthorne Performing Arts Center.
  • The Silverthorne Art Wall: A community art project showcasing the talents of 24 local Summit County artists (seven of whom were youth) that included digital reproductions of each artist’s work wrapped on aluminum panels.
  • Unity Project: This interactive community project consisted of 32 posts, each with identifiers such as “I’m a parent,” “I speak English as a second language,” “I identify as LGBTQ,” etc. Participants tied colorful yarn to posts that reflect their identities. Their yarn intertwined with others to create a web of interconnectedness. In the end, we see that we are all connected by something, and it's our diversity that builds a strong and vibrant community.